Harry Addison McIntyre

Harry Addison McIntyre was my second cousin, three times removed.  We are both descended from William Langton and Margaret Risdale who were my 4th Great Grandparents, and Harry’s Great Grandparents.  He was part of the same branch of my family as Thomas Ross Milne, in whose post I have already recounted some of the earlist days of my paternal line’s family history.

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Abbreviated family tree of Harry Addison McIntyre

Harry’s father, John, was the sixth child of Mary Ann Langton and Malcolm McIntyre. Eventually settling in Grand Valley, Ontario, slightly north-west of Toronto, John is listed throughout the census years as a Grain Buyer and a merchant.  On the 28th of January 1873 at the age of 23, he married 17-year old Mary Georgiana Rudd, also from southern Ontario. Between 1874 and 1900, they had 12 children, though sadly four of them did not survive past infancy, and one passed away at the age of 14. Their first child, a daughter born in 1874 who only lived for one day was not named, and the four other children are memorialized on the back of the grave marker of John and Mary.  In 1911, they also lost their first son William at the age of 36 to drowning.

Annie M. McIntyre

Reverse side of the grave marker of John, Mary, and William McIntyre

It was five years after this last loss, that this family’s youngest surviving child, Harry Addison, volunteered for the Canadian Expeditionary Force at the age of 17 years and 9 months.

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Harry Addison McIntyre, 1916

Harry trained in Toronto with the 164th Battalion, and sailed for England from Halifax on April 11, 1917.  He was in England for nearly a year before being transferred to the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (PPCLI), and sent to France in April of 1918.  The PPCLI was a significant part of Canada’s last 100 days of the war.  100 years ago right now, they were pushing the German lines back toward Mons where the British army first engaged the German army in 1914.

The following is verbatim from a letter written by Harry’s son, John, as he recalls what his father told him about a particular incident in the trenches during this 100 days:

He was suddenly awakened to realize that in the coming darkness three German soldiers had crept upon them and were standing on the parapet of their trench. One was a German Captain who held a Luger […] trained on them. Beside him was a German Corporal with a rifle, and a German Sargent with a machine gun, all guns pointed at the four Canadians.

[…] No prisoners were being taken after the brutal four years of war. My dad happened to be lying on his side with his left arm hidden under him in the gathering darkness. Dad was fully aware that he had a grenade clipped on his belt, and knew that this was their only hope. He very slowly moved his hand and worked the grenade loose from his belt. These grenades had a four second timer which was activated by pulling out a pin. Dad slipped his thumb into the ring which holds the pin in place, he pulled the pin, counted three seconds, then lobbed the grenade over the parapet between the Captain who was pointing his Luger at Dad standing over him, and the Sargent with the machine gun. He threw it just clear of the parapet hoping none of the shrapnel would blow down into the trench.

All three Germans died instantly and fell into the trench with the Captain right on top of Dad. All three died before they could use their gun. Dad said the first thing he did was to feel himself all over to see where the Captain shot him. He was all covered with sticky blood. It took him a while to realize that the blood was not his, and the three helped each other to push the dead soldiers of them and stood up.

The story goes on to tell how Harry found the Captain’s Luger the following morning, and decided to keep it and the shell that had been in the chamber of the gun.  Harry’s grand daughter recalls being fascinated by this gun and the shell.

The PPCLI returned to Canada in March of 1919 to great fanfare.  Harry returned to southern Ontario and studied to become a dentist. In 1923, he married Edith Pearl Jenkins in Toronto, Ontario, and eventually the two settled in Clinton, Ontario, about 20 minutes east of the south-east shore of Lake Huron. In his 40s, Harry again served his country in the second world war as a Captain in the Canadian Dental Corps.

Harry passed away in 1955 at 56 years of age in Clinton, Ontario.  I would like to extend my thanks to Harry’s granddaughter for her permission to share the photo of her Grandfather above as well as the excerpt from her father’s letter.

 

Lilian “Liby” Tee and Herbert Gardner

Lilian “Liby” Tee was my first cousin three times removed.  We are both descended from Jeremiah Pickering and Anne Filburn who were my third Great Grandparents, and Liby’s Grandparents.  I am descended from their son James Pickering, while Liby is descended from their daughter, Hannah Pickering.  Hannah was the second youngest of eleven children, and she married young, at the age of 17, to Edwin Tee.  Edwin Tee was a gardener’s labourer in Pontefract, Yorkshire. It was here that Edwin and Hannah lived after their marriage, and where they started their family.  They had five children, Liby being the 4th of the five, before Hannah’s untimely death in 1892 at the young age of 31.  Liby was only 6 at the time of her mother’s death.

By 1901, Liby, age 15, was working as a domestic servant on a cattle farm in Naburn, Yorkshire. In 1910, at the age of 24, she married Herbert Gardner, a chauffeur and motor mechanic. They had three children between their marriage and the outset of the war.  Herbert.  On August 12, 1914, only 8 days after the United Kingdom declared war on Germany, Herbert enlisted in the Army Service Corps.  Included in his file is a letter of reference from his employer that stated that “We are pleased to recommend Herbert Gardner as a driver suitable for the charge of motor cars and vans. We have known him for some years and can state that he is capable of all roadside repairs etc.”

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Letter of reference for Herbert Gardner

Herbert served through the entire war in England and France with the occasional leave home.  For most of the war, Liby and her children would have been on their own. Herbert was discharged in early 1919, and he returned to Yorkshire.  He and Liby had one more child in 1919, and they lived the rest of their lives in Yorkshire.  Herbert passed away in in 1962 at the age of 85.

 

 

 

Thomas William Pickering

Thomas William Pickering was my first cousin three times removed.  The youngest of 10 children, he joined the Territorial Forces of the British army at 18 years old. This may be the 52 Davids record for shortest post, as I could find no definitive further record of where he was assigned effective October of 1914, nor any voters list data or date of death.  Part of the confusion is due to his having two of the most common given names of the early 20th century, and one of the most common last names in Yorkshire.

If anything, this speaks to the way that records have shaped this project.  Without them, I am truly flying blind.

Sara Gladys Langton and Richard Sackville Cresswell

Sara Gladys Muriel Langton was my first cousin 3 times removed.  We are both descended from Francis Langton and Sarah Bishop who were her Grandparents, and my 3rd Great Grandparents.  She is second cousin to Martha Richmire (who I posted about in February), and first cousin to Emma Maud Law (who I posted about in December) and to my Great Grandfather Joseph James Foster who I will write about toward the end of the project.

Sarah Langton

Abbreviated family tree of Sara Gladys Muriel Langton

The youngest child of Francis Langton and Sarah Bishop was Albert Edward Langton.  His father was 51 and mother was 45 when he was born in 1866, older parents even by today’s standards.  His oldest sibling was 18 when he was born. Albert left Peterborough and his family at the age of 16.  Although we can’t know the specific reason from the records available, it is very possible that with 9 surviving older siblings, 4 of which being brothers, there may not have been much in the way of prospects connected to any family business or agricultural endeavour for him to take on once he was of age.  He moved to North Dakota where he worked as a railroad labourer.  It was here that in 1889 he married Louise Millwood whose family was also originally from Canada. It appears that over the first 15 to 20 years of their marriage they moved frequently between North Dakota and southern Manitoba, their children being born almost alternately between the two regions.  Sara, or Gladys, as she was more commonly known, their third child, was born in 1893 in Gretna, Manitoba, a border town between Canada and the United States. By 1906 it seems the family had permanently settled in Canada near Morris, Manitoba, 50 kilometres south of Winnipeg.

Richard Sackville Cresswell was born in Elham, Kent, and moved to Canada with his family in 1904 when he was 13 years old. He eventually began working for the railroad, as did Gladys’ father, as a brakeman. In early March 1915, at the age of 23, Ritchie enlisted in the 44th Overseas Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary force. This was a short-lived situation as by April 27 of the same year, he was discharged as medically unfit.  There are no clues as to what the nature of the medical reason for the discharge may have been.

Ritchie and Gladys were married in November 1915, and settled continued to live in Manitoba. They had one daughter in 1916.  Ritchie worked his entire career on the railway.  He passed away in 1970, and Gladys passed away in 1984.

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One has to wonder what the war years were like for Ritchie and Gladys.  Although he had been deemed medically unfit, he was clearly not unable to work, and with only a month spent in Winnipeg training, it would not have been evident to those who knew him casually that he had, in fact, volunteered.  As a man in his mid-20s, he would have been considered the ideal candidate for a recruit.  The pressure being exuded through government propaganda as well as through the popular media of the time (mostly newspapers and novels) framed unwillingness to join as a character flaw, or a sign of cowardice.  There was little public consideration given to a person’s or a family’s individual situation beyond how many boys they had “in khaki.” Much like it can be today though modern media, hyperbole was used to incite action for a specific cause, and this could create very deep divisions in and between communities.  Perhaps this was not an issue for Gladys and Ritchie, but the fact that it could have been, is certainly worth some thought.

John Russell Miller

John Russell Miller was my Great Grandfather. He was born on October 30, 1884 in Belfast, Northern Ireland to Walter Miller and Agnes Fee.  I know nothing about his parents other than their names.  The Allan Line steamship, Tunisian, arrived in Montreal on May 28, 1904 with my Great Grandfather as one of its passengers, and thus began the Canadian story of this branch of my family.

He settled in Toronto, and was listed in the census data of 1911 and later as a “presser.” Family stories tell of his work at the Timothy Eaton company working on lovely high end clothing. He married Elizabeth Brady in Toronto in 1910. Elizabeth was also born in Northern Ireland, and had also arrived in Canada in 1904 although later in the year than John.  When they married, John was 25, and Elizabeth was 20.  They had two children soon after their marriage, Samuel, born in 1911, and Dorothy, born in 1914.

I have a small glass cup that was purchased at the Canadian National Exhibit in 1912 and given to Elizabeth.  I’ve had it in my possession for over 15 years–my grandmother gave it to me when I was living in Ontario, and she told me that it had been her mother’s.  I’m just now realizing that since Elizabeth would have only had one child when this was purchased in 1912, and he would have been an infant at the time, it must have been John who bought it for his wife.  This is the only tangible artifact I have in my possession of any of the Davids. I’ve always found this a very special family heirloom, but it is even more beautiful to me today.

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The small cup that was given to Elizabeth Miller by her husband in 1912.

John enlisted in the war effort on November 11, 1915. He joined the Canadian Army Service Corps which provided supply services to the troops in France, and in England was responsible for feeding the troops. After training in Toronto, he sailed for England, arriving on Christmas Eve, 1915.

John worked as a cook with the corps, and it appears that he was in England for the entirety of his service.  I have no information about why he was not in a combat role, as there is nothing in his medical report from enlistment that would indicate that he was anything other than a healthy 31 year-old. That said, early in his time in England ,he was hospitalized for “rheumatism” and “myalgia” with pain in his ankles, chest, and back, and he was diagnosed with chronic bronchitis in 1917, so it is possible that this could have been indicative of a broader condition that would have made combat service untenable.

He spent the war moving to various places in England and filling in as acting corporal and acting sergeant at times.  He was specially trained, and was sent for a period of two weeks at one point to a school of cookery, and it appears that he was given special assignments cooking for senior ranks.  It was after the official conclusion of the war that he was actually wounded in his role.  On February 13, 1919, he was severely scalded as he attempted to pull a pot of boiling water off of a stove.

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Description of John’s injury.

He was in hospital for over seven weeks as the second degree burns on his left foot were treated. By mid-April 1919, he was sent to Kinmel Park in northern Wales to await repatriation to Canada.  Interestingly, he narrowly missed being present for the “mutiny” of Canadian soldiers at Kinmel Park, protesting the length of time it was taking to be repatriated, and the conditions that they were living in as they waited. John was only at Kinmel for a few weeks, sailing on May 3 for Halifax aboard the RMS Mauretania (sister ship to the famous RMS Lusitania that had sank in 1915 after being hit by UBoat torpedoes).  He was back in Toronto and discharged by May 14, 1919.  He had been overseas and away from his wife and children for nearly three and a half years. His son Samuel may have remembered him, having been 4 years old when his father went overseas, but his daughter Dorothy who had only been a year old when he left, certainly would not have.  I’m sure it was a tremendous adjustment for everyone. My grandmother was born less than two years later.

Many years later, John’s son Samuel also participated in a war, as a pilot in the Royal Air Force,  Sadly, Samuel did not survive his war, as he was shot down in 1941.  John passed away eight years later on April 9, 1949 at the relatively young age of 64.

My grandmother remembered her father very fondly.  I dedicate this post to her: Florence Elizabeth (Miller) Foster, 1921-2010.

 

Percy Freely Latham

Percy Freely Latham was my first cousin twice removed, and was first cousin to John Pickering and William Frederick Pickering. Percy’s mother, Emily Pickering; John and William’s father, John Pickering, and my great-grandmother, Mary Alice Pickering; were siblings: three of the 10 children born to James Pickering and Elizabeth Wilson.  My great grandmother was the second youngest of these sibling which is part of what accounts for her nephews being veterans of the first world war while their first cousin, my grandfather, Joseph Foster, was a veteran of the second world war.

Percy’s mother, Emily, was the eldest of the Pickering siblings, and was born in 1873 in Stockton, Yorkshire.  She was 13 years old when her family immigrated to Canada and settled in Ontario (East York, now Toronto) where her father was a rail labourer.  In 1894, at the age of 20, She married Henry Freely: a milk delivery man 20 years her senior who had immigrated from Germany as a child. Emily and Henry had five children together before Harry died due to pneumonia and heart failure in 1901.  This left Emily alone with her children, ages newborn through seven.  Percy was the second youngest, only two years old. Two years later, Emily, still only 30 years old, re-married.  Her second husband, Alexander Latham, was very much a father to the two youngest Freely children, as both of them added his name to theirs, and Percy listed him as his father on his attestation papers. Emily and Alexander had five more children together, the youngest two of whom sadly died in infancy.

Percy attested to the Canadian Expeditionary Force on February 5, 1916.  On his attestation papers, he listed his date of birth as May 18, 1897, which would have made him 18 years old.  I will spare you the math from all the dates above, but this is not consistent with other records. It wasn’t until after he had already been serving for over two years that the military discovered that he had aged himself by two years.  He was actually only 16 years old when he enlisted.  He originally enlisted in the 169th Battalion, which, after arriving in England in October 1916 was absorbed into the 5th Reserve Battalion.  At this time, Percy was transferred to the 2nd Pioneer Battalion.  Pioneer battalions were infantry battalions plus skilled labour.

It was the pioneers that built the dug outs, built the roads in forward areas, laid barbed wire entanglements, and were the power house in trench construction. Pioneers also were the ones who followed on the heels of the Infantry in the attack to fill trenches and build passable avenues for the guns to be brought forward.  (From description of 3rd Canadian Pioneers at Russians in the CEF).

He arrived with the unit in Northern France in early December where they were stationed at Fosse 10, and were supporting nearby trench activity.  The war diary of the battalion has a beautiful description of what would have been Percy’s first Christmas away from home, including the description of the dinner.

2nd Pioneer Christmas

In the spring of 1917, the 2nd Pioneers were supporting the preparations for the 2nd Canadian division’s attack on Vimy Ridge.  They were laying cable for communications and explosives, as well as track for trams in order to get supplies closer to the front.  On April 8, 1917, the day before the Canadian guns opened fire on the German line, Percy was shot in the left wrist and through to his abdomen.  He was evacuated to a field hospital at Le Treport, then back to England to recover at several different hospitals before being released in August of 1917.   Throughout the rest of 1917 and in to 1918, 18 year-old Percy was moved through several reserve battalions in Bramshott, and was even put in some senior roles on an acting basis. Late in 1918, he was returned to Canada, and discharged in January 1919 as medically unfit, likely as a result of his earlier injuries.

In the 1921 census, Percy is listed as living in Toronto with his parents and younger siblings, and his occupation is listed as “engineer.”  He married in 1924, but I have no other information about his life after this time until his death in 1969 at the age of 70.

Thomas Ross Milne

Thomas Ross Milne, the 26th entry in this series marking the half-way point, was my 3rd cousin twice removed.  We are both descended from William Langton and Margaret Risdale who were his 2nd Great Grandparents, and my 4th Great Grandparents. William and Margaret represent the beginnings of part of my Canadian heritage, as they were the first direct ancestors on my father’s side to arrive in Canada. Born in England at the end of the 18th century, this couple crossed the Atlantic with their children sometime between 1816 and 1825, settling in what is now the Peterborough area of Ontario. William and Margaret had 8 children:  I am descended from their second oldest son, Francis Joseph, while Thomas Ross Milne is descended from their eldest daughter, Mary Ann.

Milne

Abbreviated family tree of Thomas Ross Milne.

Mary Ann Langton and her husband, Malcolm Macintyre, eventually settled in Fergus, Ontario, a small community in south western Ontario, just north of Guelph.  Their eldest son, Duncan, a blacksmith, went on to marry Jean Ross, a recent arrival from Scotland, and they had twelve children between 1861 and 1879.  Their 8th child, Helen Maud Macintyre, was Thomas Ross Milne’s mother.

Helen married Thomas William Milne, a tailor, in 1892.  Thomas Ross was born the following year.  From the 1901 census, it is clear that the Milne family is living with Helen’s father-in-law, also a tailor. Through one of my connections on Ancestry, I have seen a delightful picture of three generations of Milne men, Thomas Ross, his father, and his grandfather taken when Thomas Ross is no older than 5 years old.  Unfortunately I haven’t been able to contact the owners of the picture to use it here, but if I am able to in the future, I will certainly share it.

By the 1911 census, Thomas Ross is working for the Canadian Pacific Railway as a baggageman, and by 1916, the year he enlisted in the CEF, he was a telegraph operator for the CPR. This trade directed his participation in the war as he directed to the Canadian Engineers Training Division and eventually the Canadian Signalling Corps where he served as the rank of Sapper.  He arrived in England in November 1916, and unfortunately in less than a month, was hospitalized with German measles, and wasn’t released until mid-January 1917.  By May 1917 he was in France with the Canadian Signalling Pool.  This work could have involved everything from laying and operating telephone lines, operating the very new wireless technology, or sending messages via morse code with lanterns.

He retuned to England in May of 1919, and then returned to Canada to be demobilized the following month.  He returned to his work with the CPR, and was moved to Port Arthur (now Thunder Bay) Ontario.  In December of 1919, he married Margaret Whent, and by late 1920 they were expecting their first child who, sadly, was stillborn.  They had one other child the following year in 1921, Thomas Howard Milne, the fourth in a line of Thomas Milnes, Thomas Howard joined the Royal Canadian Navy during the second world war, and another photo I’ve seen shows him standing with his father, both looking very proud.

Thomas Ross Milne passed away in 1953 at the age of 60.

John Brady

This is an interesting post for me as this is the first entry where I have memories of people who had direct connections to the subject of the post. This makes it feel both more personal and more difficult to write.

John Brady was my 2nd Great Uncle.  He and his siblings, my Great Grandmother Elizabeth Brady, my second great uncle Thomas, and my second great aunts Emily (who my father remembers fondly) and Charlotte (who I met several times as a child), were all born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, to John Brady and Emily Topping.  The family emigrated to Canada in 1904 when my Great Grandmother was 14, Thomas was 12, Aunt Em was 11, John was 8, and Aunt Charlotte was 3. The family settled in Toronto on Salem Avenue where John was a carpenter, as was his son Thomas according to the 1911 census.  In April 1911, John contracted Influenza and died soon after of pneumonia.  His eldest child, Elizabeth, had already married John Russell Miller in 1910, and had delivered her first child, Samuel, just ten days before her father’s death.  John’s other four children were still at home at the time of his death, the oldest of whom, Thomas, was 19.  In October of 1913, Thomas died of “phthisis pulmonalis,” otherwise known as Tuberculosis. Less than a year later, Canada was at war.

On February 5th, 1915, at the age of 19, John Brady enlisted in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, in the 7th Canadian Mounted Rifles. He arrived in England in June of 1915 where he was transferred to the 2nd Canadian Divisional Ammunition Column. It was with the 2nd CDAC that he first arrived in France in September of 1915.  From arrival in France until April 2, 1916, the John was was stationed near Berthen, about 20 kilometres south-west of Ypres, where the Divisional Ammunition Column functioned as the railhead where divisional ammunition was stored before being shipped to the front.  On April 2, John and 21 other ordinary ranks were transferred to the 6th Brigade of the Canadian Field Artillery.  Just over a month later, he was transferred to the 5th Brigade stationed in Dikesbusch, Belgium due to a reorganization of the brigades.

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John Brady, Age 19

It is in May 1916 that there is a first mention in his record of an issue with his hearing as he was admitted to hospital for an infection in his ear.  This became a chronic problem for him, and was attributed to his exposure to gunfire. He spent the duration of the war alternately serving in artillery units and in hospital for his painful ear.

He finally returned to Toronto in May 1919 at the age of 23.  In March of 1920, he married Gladys Louisa Moat, and together they started their family. His first three children were born in Toronto, and at some point between 1922 and 1926, he and his family moved to the United States, first to Iowa, then eventually to Illinois, settling in Chicago. In total, he and Gladys had 8 children. In an email exchange with his Granddaughter, she told me that he worked at the Chicago Tribune, and was beloved by his coworkers; so much so that when he suffered a stroke at work in 1964, a group of them carried him to a nearby hospital, where sadly, he passed away at the age of 68.

I would like to thank John’s Granddaughter for sharing her memories and family stories with me as well as for permission to use the above photograph of John in uniform.

 

 

 

 

Nellie Richmire and Edward Clinton Biccum

Martha “Nellie” Richmire was my 2nd cousin twice removed on my father’s side.  Like Emma Maud Law who I profiled in December, Nellie Richmire is also descended from Francis Joseph Langton and Sarah Bishop, my 3rd great grandparents, and Nellie’s great grandparents. As the abbreviated tree below demonstrates, Emma was in fact Nellie’s aunt.

Langton and Law abbreviated tree

Nellie’s mother, Margaret Eden Law, was the oldest child of Martha Jane Langton and John William Law. She was born in 1871, and married in 1889 to Ransom Richmire,  a teamster in Cardinal, Ontario, when her youngest sister, Emma, was only one year old.  Nellie was born in 1896 in Cardinal, where she lived with her family until marrying Edward Clinton Biccum in June of 1915.  She was 19, and Edward was 18.

Of course, when they married, the war had already been raging in Europe for 10 months, and Canada was immersed with it.  Local battalions were being created in counties across the country, and, starting in late 1915, the 156th battalion began recruiting in Grenville and Leeds counties.  Cardinal, where Edward was born, was in Grenville county, and on February 6, 1916, almost exactly 102 years ago, he travelled to the neighbouring town of Iroquois, Ontario to attest to the Canadian Expeditionary Force in the 156th.

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The 156th Battalion before sailing to Britain.  One of these men is Edward Clinton Biccum.

Cardinal is a beautifully situated village on the St. Lawrence River, directly across from New York State.  It is still a small community described as and “industrial” village, as has been its primary industry since the late 18th century.  Edward identified himself as a “labourer” on his attestation papers, and it is likely he worked in one of the mills.

On the day that he attested, his wife Nellie was 5 months pregnant with their first child. These were not the heady days of late summer 1914. The spirit of adventure that had inspired some men to enlist early on had turned to a sense of patriotism, duty, and even resignation perpetuated through the popular media of the day encouraging all men who were able to “do their bit.”  From early 1915 onwards, Canadians had been in active combat.  Many men had perished. Both Edward and Nellie would have known that enlisting was a dangerous thing for their little family.

The battalion spent its early days training close to home.  Edward would have been close by on June 14 when his son, John Edward, was born.  His son would have been just over a month old when the picture above of the entire battalion was taken.  In October 1916, Edward and the rest of the 156th bade their families goodbye, and left for Halifax to sail to England.  The 156th sailed on the Mauretania, sister ship to the famous Lusitania, and arrived in England on October 31, 1916.

Very soon after his arrival in England, Edward was temporarily promoted to Acting Lance Corporal.  He was only twenty years old. He and the other members of the 156th were split up and assigned to other battalions as reinforcements. After being assigned to the 154th and the 6th battalions, once he reverted to his rank of Private, he was assigned to the 2nd Battalion in May of 1917.

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Cap badge of the 2nd battalion of the Eastern Ontario Regiment.

Barely three months later, in August 1917, he was wounded in his arm in the Battle for Hill 70 near Lens, France.  He was evacuated to Britain to heal, and was eventually able to rejoin his battalion in France in November.

On March 21, 1918, at the age of 21, Edward was killed at what I can only assume was the first day of the German offensive at St. Quentin–the same day and at the same battle that Stanley Frederick Gill from my maternal line was taken prisoner.  I have had a hard time finding a war diary for Edward’s battalion, so I am making an educated guess that he was killed at St. Quentin based on the date and the number of men from the 2nd battalion who were killed on that day and buried in the Aix-Noulette Communal Cemetery.

Edward was posthumously awarded the rank of Corporal. I am honoured to share the CWGC commemorative certificate for my cousin’s husband here.

Back in Cardinal, Nellie Biccum and her toddler John, not yet two years old, were left without their husband and father. In the 1921 census, the two are listed as living on their own, but her parents and siblings were living in nearby Edwardsburg, so one hopes that she had some assistance.

In August of 1925, just over ten years after her marriage to Edward, she married Frank Brant, a 30-year old farmer from Michigan.  Nellie and John moved with Frank to Michigan where the new couple had three more children, Margaret, James, and Dorothy, born in 1926, 1928, and 1930 respectively.  Nellie died in 1978 at the age of 82, and John Biccum died in 1989 at the age of 72. Although Edward never got to see his son take his first steps, his descendants and his name are still in Michigan today.

 

 

William Frederick Pickering

William Pickering was the younger brother of John Pickering. He was born in 1903, so you may already get a sense of the direction of this story.  In February of 1918, he was not not quite 14 and a half years old.  His brother John was seriously wounded at Vimy the previous year, and was back in Toronto at a convalescent hospital. On February 26, William went to a recruiting station, and he embellished his age by four years, claiming to be 18 and a half.

On his enlistment papers his height was recorded as just over five foot three, and 116 pounds, which would have been considered fairly short and light for an eighteen year old, even by the standards of a century ago. Even so, he was declared fit for service, and was enlisted in the 1st Depot Battalion of the 1st Central Ontario Regiment.

By April 1918, he was being treated for prostatitis in hospital.  Whether it was through his time in hospital that his true age was discovered is unclear, but by June, 1918, Private William Pickering was discharged from the military as underage.  He was not yet 15.

I can’t help wonder what possessed him to try and enlist.  His brother’s injuries, which he would have undoubtedly seen, were horrific.  Was it because of this, or despite it that he enlisted? Were there other drivers? He was a teenaged boy in the home of his mother and step father and their three-year old son–was this a factor? He wasn’t in school–why did he leave?

Regardless of his reasons for enlisting, William, unlike many other boy recruits, did not go overseas and see battle. He lived out his life in Toronto, and passed away in 1977 at the age of 73.